Scotch Lamb PGI

What is PGI?

Scotch Lamb PGI

PGI stands for Protected Geographical Indication. It’s an EU scheme to protect and promote high quality traditional and regional food products unique to a geographic area. Scotch Lamb has long held this coveted PGI status.

Scotch Lamb PGI is specially selected and only sourced from Scottish farms that adopt best practice regarding animal welfare and natural production methods. When you see the PGI badge with the Scotch Lamb logo, you can be confident that all lamb were born, reared and processed in Scotland and held whole life quality assurance.

Scottish Lamb

Scottish lamb refers to any lambs that have been born, reared and processed in Scotland independent of any quality guarantees. It holds no PGI status.

What does Scotch Lamb PGI mean to me?

The genuine article.

Scotch Lamb takes its quality and characteristics from a stress-free life grazing on the Scottish hills. The farms and processors are independently audited to make sure they meet our requirements regarding animal welfare and natural production methods. This means that the Scotch Lamb PGI you buy is fully traceable to farms of origin, resulting in the tastiest lamb in the world.

Special attention is paid to animal welfare and wellbeing

The QMS Welfare and Wellbeing Charter

QMS is a Scottish Public Body with an overall strategy to shape a sustainable and prospering Scottish red meat industry. Animal Welfare and Wellbeing are important factors in this strategy, and the guiding principles in this Animal Welfare and Wellbeing Charter are embedded in all QMS Quality Assurance Schemes and activities. QMS recognises the Scottish SPCA as its leading partner in matters relating to Animal Welfare and Wellbeing and this collaboration underlines our commitment to transparency and independence.

Read more about the guiding principles of this Animal Welfare and Wellbeing Charter.

Sustainable sheep farming

The rules

Our farmers follow certain practices to help them farm sustainably and produce the highest quality Scotch Lamb.

The Scottish industry works very closely with the Scottish SPCA (Scotland’s animal welfare charity). Scottish inspectors regularly visit our farms and animal health is also a priority in Scottish livestock production.

Production plays an important part in sustaining the diverse landscape for which Scotland is famed. Scotland’s hill livestock farmers typically farm both cattle and sheep, a mixed grazing system which benefits landscape biodiversity (Source: Scottish Natural Heritage).

You can read about all the other sustainable farming practices here.

Social Sustainability

Aimee and Kirsty Budge

Sustaining Jobs

Around 33,000 jobs in Scotland depend on the Scottish red meat industry, and many of these jobs sustain employment in fragile rural communities.

Sheep farmer

Farming Families

Scottish livestock farms typically remain in the same family, allowing farming skills to be passed down through generations. This includes invaluable knowledge of the terrain and conditions, as well as animal care skills.

Social heritage of lamb farming

Social Heritage

Livestock production has played a key role in Scotland’s social heritage for centuries. Sheep farming remains at the heart of rural communities throughout the country.

Know your Scotch Lamb Cuts

Cut 1. Neck

Because they do more work, the muscles in the neck tend to be tougher than other cuts. However, when cooked slowly they produce a deliciously tender and tasty product perfect for stews and curries.

Cut 2. Shoulder

The shoulder joint is very versatile and extremely popular amongst chefs. For a delicious and tender result, the shoulder should be cooked much slower and longer than the leg joint. The shoulder is also an alternative source of steaks, but it would be better to marinade or cook slower.

Cut 3. Shank / Shin

This meaty cut from the lower end of the leg is packed full of flavour and becomes deliciously tender when slow cooked. Lamb shank has had a big rise in popularity in recent years, but is still an affordable option that yields a generous amount of meat.

Cut 4. Best end / Rack of lamb

The best end is the joint between the neck and loin comprising the first eight ribs and the lean meat between them. It’s a very versatile cut that can be prepared in a number of ways. The rack of lamb makes a supreme roast, or it can be cut into small chops known as cutlets.

Cut 5. Loin

Loins can be roasted, but are more commonly available as quick cooking cuts for the eager chef. Compared with other parts of the animal, loin cuts can be very lean. The eye of the loin can be trimmed of all fat and treated as a mini fillet. In this sense, the steaks are referred to as ‘noisettes’. Most commonly, however, the loin is used for small steaks.

Cut 6. Breast / Flank

Often underused, the breast contributes around 14% of carcase volume. It’s one of the least expensive cuts of lamb, and can be supplied bone-in or boned. Lamb breast is full of flavour but needs to be cooked slowly. It is generally used most with a stuffing, and although it’s quite fatty, the fat melts off during cooking and can be poured away.

Cut 7. Chump

Lamb chump is the point where the leg and loin meet. It’s either sold as chops or with the bone removed as steaks, and is ideal for baking slowly in the oven. If roasting isn’t your thing, it’s versatile enough to fry, braise or even barbeque for a delicious result.

Cut 8. Leg

Leg of lamb is extremely well known and lends itself to a number of delicious products. It can be roasted bone-in or boned, rolled and tied with a stuffing of your choice. Alternatively you can source Scotch Lamb leg steaks, which can be grilled/pan fried whole or cut into strips for a stir-fry.

Cut 9. Shank / Shin

This meaty cut from the lower end of the leg is packed full of flavour and becomes deliciously tender when slow cooked. Lamb shank has had a big rise in popularity in recent years, but is still an affordable option that yields a generous amount of meat.

lamb Recipes & Tips

View more

Scottish farming heritage

Scottish Farming Heritage

The history of Scottish farming can be traced back for hundreds of years. Today, the farming industry is the biggest determinant of Scotland’s landscape, with 75% of Scotland’s land mass used for agricultural production.

Scotland has a rich diversity of breeds, which, over time, have adapted to the somewhat changeable Scottish climate. Each farm in Scotland will choose sheep that perform best in their unique environment, landscape and grazing land. Two breeds dominate the farming mix in Scotland, the Blackface lamb and the Cheviot.

Livestock production has played a key role in Scotland’s social heritage for centuries, with sheep farming remains at the heart of rural communities throughout the country. Scottish livestock farms typically remain in the same family, allowing farming skills to be passed down through generations. This includes invaluable knowledge of the terrain and conditions, as well as animal care skills.

Scotland’s farming has a proud history, and we are continually innovating and striving for excellence to see this continue long into the future.

Where can I buy Scotch Beef and Scotch Lamb?

Scotch Beef and Scotch Lamb PGI are available at most supermarkets, usually at the butcher counter. Just ask the counter staff if you’re not sure.

You can also buy Scotch Beef and Scotch Lamb PGI at independent butchers.

Find your nearest at our sister site below.

Scotch Butchers Club

If you’re not in the mood for cooking, Scotch Beef PGI is also served at many quality restaurants. Find one near you at our sister site below.

Scotch Beef Club

Where else to buy:

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